New resting-state fMRI related studies at PubMed

Subscribe to New resting-state fMRI related studies at PubMed feed New resting-state fMRI related studies at PubMed
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=resting state fMRI
Updated: 5 hours 32 min ago

Earliest amyloid and tau deposition modulate the influence of limbic networks during closed-loop hippocampal downregulation.

Tue, 02/25/2020 - 19:20
Related Articles

Earliest amyloid and tau deposition modulate the influence of limbic networks during closed-loop hippocampal downregulation.

Brain. 2020 Feb 24;:

Authors: Skouras S, Torner J, Andersson P, Koush Y, Falcon C, Minguillon C, Fauria K, Alpiste F, Blenow K, Zetterberg H, Gispert JD, Molinuevo JL, ALFA Study

Abstract
Research into hippocampal self-regulation abilities may help determine the clinical significance of hippocampal hyperactivity throughout the pathophysiological continuum of Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we aimed to identify the effects of amyloid-β peptide 42 (amyloid-β42) and phosphorylated tau on the patterns of functional connectomics involved in hippocampal downregulation. We identified 48 cognitively unimpaired participants (22 with elevated CSF amyloid-β peptide 42 levels, 15 with elevated CSF phosphorylated tau levels, mean age of 62.705 ± 4.628 years), from the population-based 'Alzheimer's and Families' study, with baseline MRI, CSF biomarkers, APOE genotyping and neuropsychological evaluation. We developed a closed-loop, real-time functional MRI neurofeedback task with virtual reality and tailored it for training downregulation of hippocampal subfield cornu ammonis 1 (CA1). Neurofeedback performance score, cognitive reserve score, hippocampal volume, number of apolipoprotein ε4 alleles and sex were controlled for as confounds in all cross-sectional analyses. First, using voxel-wise multiple regression analysis and controlling for CSF biomarkers, we identified the effect of healthy ageing on eigenvector centrality, a measure of each voxel's overall influence based on iterative whole-brain connectomics, during hippocampal CA1 downregulation. Then, controlling for age, we identified the effects of abnormal CSF amyloid-β42 and phosphorylated tau levels on eigenvector centrality during hippocampal CA1 downregulation. Across subjects, our main findings during hippocampal downregulation were: (i) in the absence of abnormal biomarkers, age correlated with eigenvector centrality negatively in the insula and midcingulate cortex, and positively in the inferior temporal gyrus; (ii) abnormal CSF amyloid-β42 (<1098) correlated negatively with eigenvector centrality in the anterior cingulate cortex and primary motor cortex; and (iii) abnormal CSF phosphorylated tau levels (>19.2) correlated with eigenvector centrality positively in the ventral striatum, anterior cingulate and somatosensory cortex, and negatively in the precuneus and orbitofrontal cortex. During resting state functional MRI, similar eigenvector centrality patterns in the cingulate had previously been associated to CSF biomarkers in mild cognitive impairment and dementia patients. Using the developed closed-loop paradigm, we observed such patterns, which are characteristic of advanced disease stages, during a much earlier presymptomatic phase. In the absence of CSF biomarkers, our non-invasive, interactive, adaptive and gamified neuroimaging procedure may provide important information for clinical prognosis and monitoring of therapeutic efficacy. We have released the developed paradigm and analysis pipeline as open-source software to facilitate replication studies.

PMID: 32091109 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Altered Interactions Among Resting-State Networks in Individuals with Obesity.

Tue, 02/25/2020 - 19:20
Related Articles

Altered Interactions Among Resting-State Networks in Individuals with Obesity.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2020 Mar;28(3):601-608

Authors: Ding Y, Ji G, Li G, Zhang W, Hu Y, Liu L, Wang Y, Hu C, von Deneen KM, Han Y, Cui G, Wang H, Wiers CE, Manza P, Tomasi D, Volkow ND, Nie Y, Wang GJ, Zhang Y

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate alterations in functional connectivity (FC) within and interactions between resting-state networks involved in salience, executive control, and interoception in participants with obesity (OB).
METHODS: Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging with independent component analysis and FC, alterations within and interactions between resting-state networks in 35 OB and 35 normal-weight controls (NW) were investigated.
RESULTS: Compared with NW, OB showed reduced FC strength in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus within the default-mode network, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex within the salience network (SN), bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex-angular gyrus within the frontoparietal network (FPN), and increased FC strength in the insula (INS) (Pfamilywise error  < 0.0125). The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex FC strength was negatively correlated with craving for food cues, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex FC strength was negatively correlated with Yale Food Addiction Scale scores, and right INS FC strength was positively correlated with craving for high-calorie food cues. Compared with NW, OB also showed increased FC between the SN and FPN driven by altered FC of bilateral INS and anterior cingulate cortex-angular gyrus.
CONCLUSIONS: Alterations in FC within and interactions between the SN, default-mode network, and FPN might contribute to the high incentive value of food (craving), lack of control of overeating (compulsive overeating), and increased awareness of hunger (impaired interoception) in OB.

PMID: 32090510 [PubMed - in process]

European Academy of Neurology guideline on the diagnosis of coma and other disorders of consciousness.

Tue, 02/25/2020 - 19:20
Related Articles

European Academy of Neurology guideline on the diagnosis of coma and other disorders of consciousness.

Eur J Neurol. 2020 Feb 23;:

Authors: Kondziella D, Bender A, Diserens K, van Erp W, Estraneo A, Formisano R, Laureys S, Naccache L, Ozturk S, Rohaut B, Sitt JD, Stender J, Tiainen M, Rossetti AO, Gosseries O, Chatelle C, EAN Panel on Coma, Disorders of Consciousness

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with acquired brain injury and acute or prolonged disorders of consciousness (DoC) are challenging. Evidence to support diagnostic decisions on coma and other DoC is limited but accumulating. This guideline provides the state-of-the-art evidence regarding the diagnosis of DoC, summarizing data from bedside examination techniques, functional neuroimaging and electroencephalography (EEG).
METHODS: Sixteen members of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Scientific Panel on Coma and Chronic Disorders of Consciousness, representing 10 European countries, reviewed the scientific evidence for the evaluation of coma and other DoC using standard bibliographic measures. Recommendations followed the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The guideline was endorsed by the EAN.
RESULTS: Besides a comprehensive neurological examination, the following suggestions are made: probe for voluntary eye movements using a mirror; repeat clinical assessments in the subacute and chronic setting, using the Coma Recovery Scale - Revised; use the Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score instead of the Glasgow Coma Scale in the acute setting; obtain clinical standard EEG; search for sleep patterns on EEG, particularly rapid eye movement sleep and slow-wave sleep; and, whenever feasible, consider positron emission tomography, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), active fMRI or EEG paradigms and quantitative analysis of high-density EEG to complement behavioral assessment in patients without command following at the bedside.
CONCLUSIONS: Standardized clinical evaluation, EEG-based techniques and functional neuroimaging should be integrated for multimodal evaluation of patients with DoC. The state of consciousness should be classified according to the highest level revealed by any of these three approaches.

PMID: 32090418 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

MALINI (Machine Learning in NeuroImaging): A MATLAB toolbox for aiding clinical diagnostics using resting-state fMRI data.

Tue, 02/25/2020 - 19:20
Related Articles

MALINI (Machine Learning in NeuroImaging): A MATLAB toolbox for aiding clinical diagnostics using resting-state fMRI data.

Data Brief. 2020 Apr;29:105213

Authors: Lanka P, Rangaprakash D, Gotoor SSR, Dretsch MN, Katz JS, Denney TS, Deshpande G

Abstract
Resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (rs-fMRI) has been extensively used for diagnostic classification because it does not require task compliance and is easier to pool data from multiple imaging sites, thereby increasing the sample size. A MATLAB-based toolbox called Machine Learning in NeuroImaging (MALINI) for feature extraction and disease classification is presented. The MALINI toolbox extracts functional and effective connectivity features from preprocessed rs-fMRI data and performs classification between healthy and disease groups using any of 18 popular and widely used machine learning algorithms that are based on diverse principles. A consensus classifier combining the power of multiple classifiers is also presented. The utility of the toolbox is illustrated by accompanying data consisting of resting-state functional connectivity features from healthy controls and subjects with various brain-based disorders: autism spectrum disorder from autism brain imaging data exchange (ABIDE), Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment from Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder from ADHD-200, and post-traumatic stress disorder and post-concussion syndrome acquired in-house. Results of classification performed on the above datasets can be obtained from the main article titled "Supervised machine learning for diagnostic classification from large-scale neuroimaging datasets" [1]. The data was divided into homogeneous and heterogeneous splits, such that 80% could be used for training, model building and cross-validation, while the remaining 20% of the data could be used as a hold-out independent test data for replication of the classification performance, to ensure the robustness of the classifiers to population variance in image acquisition site and age of the sample.

PMID: 32090157 [PubMed]

Altered spontaneous brain activity pattern in patients with ophthalmectomy: an resting-state fMRI study.

Tue, 02/25/2020 - 19:20
Related Articles

Altered spontaneous brain activity pattern in patients with ophthalmectomy: an resting-state fMRI study.

Int J Ophthalmol. 2020;13(2):263-270

Authors: Zhang B, Li B, Liu RQ, Shu YQ, Min YL, Yuan Q, Zhu PW, Lin Q, Ye L, Shao Y

Abstract
AIM: To use the voxel-wise degree centrality (DC) method to explore the underlying functional network brain-activity in patients with ophthalmectomy.
METHODS: A total of 32 ophthalmic surgery patients (10 women and 22 men), and 32 healthy subjects (10 women and 22 men) highly matched in gender, age, and the same operation method. Everyone experienced a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. The spontaneous brain activity could be assessed by DC. Correlation analysis was used to explore the relationships between the average DC signal values and behavior performance in different regions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was utilized to differentiate between ophthalmectomy patients and healthy controls (HCs).
RESULTS: Compared with HCs, ophthalmectomy patients had greatly reduced DC values in left lingual gyrus, bilateral lingual lobe, left cingulate gyrus, and increased DC values of left cerebellum posterior lobe, left middle frontal gyrus1, right supramarginal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus2, right middle frontal gyrus. However, we did not find that there was a correlation between the average DC values from various brain regions and clinical manifestations.
CONCLUSION: Dysfunction may be caused by ophthalmectomy in lots of cerebral areas, which may show the potential pathological mechanism of ophthalmectomy and it is beneficial to clinical diagnosis.

PMID: 32090036 [PubMed]

An fMRI Study of the Effects of Vibroacoustic Stimulation on Functional Connectivity in Patients with Insomnia.

Tue, 02/25/2020 - 19:20
Related Articles

An fMRI Study of the Effects of Vibroacoustic Stimulation on Functional Connectivity in Patients with Insomnia.

Sleep Disord. 2020;2020:7846914

Authors: Zabrecky G, Shahrampour S, Whitely C, Alizadeh M, Conklin C, Wintering N, Doghramji K, Zhan T, Mohamed F, Newberg A, Monti D

Abstract
Background: It is well known that vibratory and auditory stimuli from vehicles such as cars and trains can help induce sleep. More recent literature suggests that specific types of vibratory and acoustic stimulation might help promote sleep, but this has not been tested with neuroimaging. Thus, the purpose of this study was to observe the effects of vibroacoustic stimulation (providing both vibratory and auditory stimuli) on functional connectivity changes in the brain using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI), and compare these changes to improvements in sleep in patients with insomnia.
Methods: For this study, 30 patients with insomnia were randomly assigned to receive one month of a vibroacoustic stimulation or be placed in a waitlist control. Patients were evaluated pre- and postprogram with qualitative sleep questionnaires and measurement of sleep duration with an actigraphy watch. In addition, patients underwent rs-fMRI to assess functional connectivity.
Results: The results demonstrated that those patients receiving the vibroacoustic stimulation had significant improvements in measured sleep minutes as well as in scores on the Insomnia Severity Index questionnaire. In addition, significant changes were noted in functional connectivity in association with the vermis, cerebellar hemispheres, thalamus, sensorimotor area, nucleus accumbens, and prefrontal cortex.
Conclusions: The results of this study show that vibroacoustic stimulation alters the brain's functional connectivity as well as improves sleep in patients with insomnia.

PMID: 32089894 [PubMed]

Frontotemporal degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): a longitudinal MRI one-year study.

Tue, 02/25/2020 - 19:20
Related Articles

Frontotemporal degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): a longitudinal MRI one-year study.

CNS Spectr. 2020 Feb 24;:1-10

Authors: Trojsi F, Di Nardo F, Siciliano M, Caiazzo G, Femiano C, Passaniti C, Ricciardi D, Russo A, Bisecco A, Esposito S, Monsurrò MR, Cirillo M, Santangelo G, Esposito F, Tedeschi G

Abstract
OBJECTIVE.: Advanced neuroimaging techniques may offer the potential to monitor disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative, multisystem disease that still lacks therapeutic outcome measures. We aim to investigate longitudinal functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes in a cohort of patients with ALS monitored for one year after diagnosis.
METHODS.: Resting state functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and voxel-based morphometry analyses were performed in 22 patients with ALS examined by six-monthly MRI scans over one year.
RESULTS.: During the follow-up period, patients with ALS showed reduced functional connectivity only in some extramotor areas, such as the middle temporal gyrus in the left frontoparietal network after six months and in the left middle frontal gyrus in the default mode network after one year without showing longitudinal changes of cognitive functions. Moreover, after six months, we reported in the ALS group a decreased fractional anisotropy (P = .003, Bonferroni corrected) in the right uncinate fasciculus. Conversely, we did not reveal significant longitudinal changes of functional connectivity in the sensorimotor network, as well as of gray matter (GM) atrophy or of DTI metrics in motor areas, although clinical measures of motor disability showed significant decline throughout the three time points.
CONCLUSION.: Our findings highlighted that progressive impairment of extramotor frontotemporal networks may precede the appearance of executive and language dysfunctions and GM changes in ALS. Functional connectivity changes in cognitive resting state networks might represent candidate radiological markers of disease progression.

PMID: 32089134 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

PAC1R Genotype to Phenotype Correlations in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Tue, 02/25/2020 - 19:20
Related Articles

PAC1R Genotype to Phenotype Correlations in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Autism Res. 2019 02;12(2):200-211

Authors: Goodrich M, Armour AC, Panchapakesan K, You X, Devaney J, Knoblach S, Sullivan CAW, Herrero MJ, Gupta AR, Vaidya CJ, Kenworthy L, Corbin JG

Abstract
Amygdala dysfunction has been implicated in numerous neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Previous studies in mice and humans, respectively, have linked Pac1r/PAC1R function to social behavior and PTSD-susceptibility. Based on this connection to social and emotional processing and the central role played by the amygdala in ASD, we examined a putative role for PAC1R in social deficits in ASD and determined the pattern of gene expression in the developing mouse and human amygdala. We reveal that Pac1r/PAC1R is expressed in both mouse and human amygdala from mid-neurogenesis through early postnatal stages, critical time points when altered brain trajectories are hypothesized to unfold in ASD. We further find that parents of autistic children carrying a previously identified PTSD-risk genotype (CC) report greater reciprocal social deficits compared to those carrying the non-risk GC genotype. Additionally, by exploring resting-state functional connectivity differences in a subsample of the larger behavioral sample, we find higher functional connectivity between the amygdala and right middle temporal gyrus in individuals with the CC risk genotype. Thus, using multimodal approaches, our data reveal that the amygdala-expressed PAC1R gene may be linked to severity of ASD social phenotype and possible alterations in brain connectivity, therefore potentially acting as a modifier of amygdala-related phenotypes. Autism Res 2019, 12: 200-211 © 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. LAY SUMMARY: In this multimodal study across mouse and human, we examined expression patterns of Pac1r/PAC1R, a gene implicated in social behavior, and further explored whether a previously identified human PTSD-linked mutation in PAC1R can predict brain connectivity and social deficits in ASD. We find that PAC1R is highly expressed in the both the mouse and human amygdala. Furthermore, our human data suggest that PAC1R genotype is linked to severity of social deficits and functional amygdala connectivity in ASD.

PMID: 30556326 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Evidence of regional associations between age-related inter-individual differences in resting-state functional connectivity and cortical thinning revealed through a multi-level analysis.

Mon, 02/24/2020 - 11:40

Evidence of regional associations between age-related inter-individual differences in resting-state functional connectivity and cortical thinning revealed through a multi-level analysis.

Neuroimage. 2020 Feb 20;:116662

Authors: Vieira BH, Rondinoni C, Garrido Salmon CE

Abstract
Normal aging incurs functional and anatomical alterations in the brain. Cortical thinning, age-related alterations in resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) and reductions in fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF) are key components of brain aging that can be studied by neuroimaging. However, the level of association between these processes has not been fully established. We performed an analysis at multiple-levels, i.e. region or connection and modality, to investigate whether the evidence for the effect of aging on fALFF, RSFC and cortical thickness are associated in a large cohort. Our results show that there is a positive association between the level of evidence of age-related effects in all three in the brain. We also demonstrate that on a regional basis the association between RSFC alterations and cortical atrophy may be either positive or negative, which may indicate compensatory mechanisms predicted by the Scaffolding Theory of Aging and Cognition (STAC).

PMID: 32088317 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

resting state fMRI; +21 new citations

Sun, 02/23/2020 - 14:56

21 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

resting state fMRI

These pubmed results were generated on 2020/02/23

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

resting state fMRI; +19 new citations

Sat, 02/22/2020 - 19:30

19 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

resting state fMRI

These pubmed results were generated on 2020/02/22

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Striatal Resting-State Connectivity Abnormalities Associated With Different Clinical Stages of Major Depressive Disorder.

Fri, 02/21/2020 - 21:40

Striatal Resting-State Connectivity Abnormalities Associated With Different Clinical Stages of Major Depressive Disorder.

J Clin Psychiatry. 2020 Feb 18;81(2):

Authors: Wang L, Li F, Mitchell PB, Wang CY, Si TM

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Reward deficits and associated striatal circuitry have been implicated in the onset and progression of major depressive disorder (MDD). This work was conducted to clarify how the striatal circuitry is involved in the established risk, acute episodes, and remission of MDD.
METHODS: Striatal subregion resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) was calculated for 29 currently depressed and 28 remitted patients diagnosed with MDD per the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, 19 first-degree relatives of these patients, and 57 healthy controls (HCs) based on resting-state fMRI data collected between May 2007 and September 2014.
RESULTS: Compared with HCs, the other 3 groups showed increased RSFC between left dorsal caudate (DC) and right insula but reduced RSFC between right putamen and left cerebellum. The currently depressed group showed increased FC between right DC and superior frontal gyrus but reduced RSFC between putamen and right anterior cingulate as well as other striatal nuclei compared with the other 3 groups. Although no results were found in ventral striatum (VS) seeds during analysis of covariance, the comparison between currently depressed and remitted patients showed increased RSFC between right superior VS and left inferior frontal gyrus in currently depressed patients at a more linear threshold. Also, both superior and inferior VS showed increased RSFC with superior and inferior frontal gyri but reduced RSFC with cerebellum in relatives compared with HCs. Higher DC-superior frontal gyrus RSFC (r = 0.438, P = .022) was correlated with more severe depression, but lower within-putamen FC was correlated with more severe depression (r = -0.446, P = .02) and retardation (r = -0.465, P = .011).
CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that reduced VS-frontal, within-putamen, and putamen-cingulate RSFC in currently depressed patients is dependent on current depressive episode and has implications for symptomatic monitoring, while increased caudate-insular and reduced VS-cerebellar RSFC in remitted patients and first-degree relatives might be related to the disease itself and have potential for predicting risk for and recurrence of MDD.

PMID: 32078260 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

The orbitofrontal cortex functionally links obesity and white matter hyperintensities.

Fri, 02/21/2020 - 21:40
Related Articles

The orbitofrontal cortex functionally links obesity and white matter hyperintensities.

Sci Rep. 2020 Feb 19;10(1):2930

Authors: Park BY, Byeon K, Lee MJ, Kim SH, Park H

Abstract
Many studies have linked dysfunction in cognitive control-related brain regions with obesity and the burden of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs). This study aimed to explore how functional connectivity differences in the brain are associated with WMH burden and degree of obesity using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 182 participants. Functional connectivity measures were compared among four different groups: (1) low WMH burden, non-obese; (2) low WMH burden, obese; (3) high WMH burden, non-obese; and (4) high WMH burden, obese. At a large-scale network-level, no networks showed significant interaction effects, but the frontoparietal network showed a main effect of degree of obesity. At a finer node level, the orbitofrontal cortex showed interaction effects between periventricular WMH burden and degree of obesity. Higher functional connectivity was observed when the periventricular WMH burden and degree of obesity were both high. These results indicate that the functional connectivity of the orbitofrontal cortex is affected by the mutual interaction between the periventricular WMHs and degree of obesity. Our results suggest that this region links obesity with WMHs in terms of functional connectivity.

PMID: 32076088 [PubMed - in process]

Amygdala activity related to perceived social support.

Fri, 02/21/2020 - 21:40
Related Articles

Amygdala activity related to perceived social support.

Sci Rep. 2020 Feb 19;10(1):2951

Authors: Sato W, Kochiyama T, Uono S, Sawada R, Yoshikawa S

Abstract
Perceived social support enhances well-being and prevents stress-related ill-being. A recent structural neuroimaging study reported that the amygdala volume is positively associated with perceived social support. However, it remains unknown how neural activity in this region and functional connectivity (FC) between this and other regions are related to perceived social support. To investigate these issues, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed to analyze the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF). Perceived social support was evaluated using the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). Lower fALFF values in the bilateral amygdalae were associated with higher MSPSS scores. Additionally, stronger FC between the left amygdala and right orbitofrontal cortex and between the left amygdala and bilateral precuneus were associated with higher MSPSS scores. The present findings suggest that reduced amygdala activity and heightened connectivity between the amygdala and other regions underlie perceived social support and its positive functions.

PMID: 32076036 [PubMed - in process]

Altered hippocampal functional connectivity in primary Sjögren syndrome: a resting-state fMRI study.

Fri, 02/21/2020 - 21:40
Related Articles

Altered hippocampal functional connectivity in primary Sjögren syndrome: a resting-state fMRI study.

Lupus. 2020 Feb 19;:961203320908936

Authors: Zhang XD, Zhao LR, Zhou JM, Su YY, Ke J, Cheng Y, Li JL, Shen W

Abstract
Structural and metabolic abnormalities in the hippocampus have been associated with the pathophysiological mechanism of central nervous system involvement in primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS). Nevertheless, how hippocampal function is altered in pSS remains unknown. The purpose of our study is to investigate the alterations in hippocampal functional connectivity (FC) in pSS by using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). Thirty-eight patients with pSS and 38 age- and education level-matched healthy controls (HCs) underwent magnetic resonance imaging examination. Prior to each MRI examination, neuropsychological tests were performed. Left and right hippocampal FCs were analyzed by using seed-based whole-brain correlation and compared between pSS and HCs. Spearman correlation analysis was performed between the z-value of hippocampal FC in brain regions with significant difference between the two groups and neuropsychological tests/clinical data in pSS. Compared with the controls, the patients with pSS showed decreased hippocampal FC between the left hippocampus and the right inferior occipital gray (IOG)/inferior temporal gray (ITG), as well as between the right hippocampus and right IOG/middle occipital gray (MOG), left MOG, and left middle temporal gray. In addition, increased hippocampal FCs were detected between the left hippocampus and left putamen, as well as between the right hippocampus and right cerebellum posterior lobe. Moreover, the visual reproduction score positively correlated with the FC between right hippocampus and right IOG/MOG. The white matter hyperintensity score negatively correlated with the FC between left hippocampus and right IOG/ITG. In conclusion, patients with pSS suffered decreased hippocampal FC mainly sited in the occipital and temporal cortex with right hippocampal laterality. Altered hippocampal FC might be a potential biomarker in detecting brain function changes and guiding neuroprotection in pSS.

PMID: 32075510 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

[Voxel-based morphometry study of the brain structures in patients with congenital hereditary hearing loss].

Fri, 02/21/2020 - 21:40
Related Articles

[Voxel-based morphometry study of the brain structures in patients with congenital hereditary hearing loss].

Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi. 2020 Feb 07;55(2):81-86

Authors: Cao W, Guan B

Abstract
Objective: To analyze the physiological basics for changes of cerebral functions in patients with congenital hereditary hearing loss (CHHL), by using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Methods: From June 2016 to June 2017, we recruited volunteers from Yangzhou Special Education School and CHHL patients from the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Subei People's Hospital as a case group with a total of 14 cases (8 males and 6 females), with an average age from 10 to 18 (13.13 ± 0.39). At the same time,patients with no ear diseases were recruited as a control group, a total of 23 cases (10 males and 13 females), with an average age from 10 to18 (13.50 ± 0.49). Brain scanning with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all subjects, and 3D T1WI was collected and processed by the analyzing software. Two sample t-tests were conducted with alphasim correction at the threshold level of P<0.001. Different morphologies of cerebral cortex were identified between patients with CHHL and their normal controls retrospectively. Results: Compared to their normal controls, patients with CHHL had no significant difference in terms of brain volume, gray matter volume, white matter volume, and cerebrospinal fluid volume ((1 397.53±103.98)cm(3) vs. (1 439.45±128.84)cm(3), (765.19±60.27)cm(3) vs. (800.139±77.64)cm(3), (392.89±40.38)cm(3) vs. (414.54±49.22)cm(3), (314.17±25.81)cm(3) vs. (296.47±51.42)cm(3), all P>0.05). However, compared to their normal controls, patients with CHHL had significantly increased (P<0.001) gray matter in the following cerebral gyri: right temporal pole: middle temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, left middle occipital gyrus, right inferior parietal gyrus, and left middle frontal gyrus, left superior occipital gyrus, right superior frontal gyrus, and left superior frontal gyrus. Furthermore, compared to their normal controls, patients with CHHL had significantly decreased (P<0.001) gray matter in the following cerebral gyri: left parahippocampal gyrus, right fusiform gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus, right middle occipital gyrus, left insula, right inferior frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus, and right superior parietal gyrus. Conclusions: Patients with CHHL show global changes in cerebral cortex not limited to auditory associated cerebral areas. This suggests that adaptable reshaping of global brain structures and functions has occurred in patients with CHHL.

PMID: 32074743 [PubMed - in process]

Functional connectivity and structural analysis of trial spinal cord stimulation responders in failed back surgery syndrome.

Thu, 02/20/2020 - 14:00
Related Articles

Functional connectivity and structural analysis of trial spinal cord stimulation responders in failed back surgery syndrome.

PLoS One. 2020;15(2):e0228306

Authors: Pahapill PA, Chen G, Arocho-Quinones EV, Nencka AS, Li SJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Chronic pain has been associated with alterations in brain structure and function that appear dependent on pain phenotype. Functional connectivity (FC) data on chronic back pain (CBP) is limited and based on heterogeneous pain populations. We hypothesize that failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) patients being considered for spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy have altered resting state (RS) FC cross-network patterns that 1) specifically involve emotion and reward/aversion functions and 2) are related to pain scores.
METHODS: RS functional MRI (fMRI) scans were obtained for 10 FBSS patients who are being considered for but who have not yet undergone implantation of a permanent SCS device and 12 healthy age-matched controls. Seven RS networks were analyzed including the striatum (STM). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test evaluated differences in cross-network FC strength (FCS). Differences in periaqueductal grey (PAG) FC were assessed with seed-based analysis.
RESULTS: Cross-network FCS was decreased (p<0.05) between the STM and all other networks in these FBSS patients. There was a negative linear relationship (R2 = 0.76, p<0.0022) between STMFCS index and pain scores. The PAG showed decreased FC with network elements and amygdala but increased FC with the sensorimotor cortex and cingulate gyrus.
CONCLUSIONS: Decreased FC between STM and other RS networks in FBSS has not been previously reported. This STMFCS index may represent a more objective measure of chronic pain specific to FBSS which may help guide patient selection for SCS and subsequent management.

PMID: 32074111 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Looping Star fMRI in Cognitive Tasks and Resting State.

Thu, 02/20/2020 - 14:00
Related Articles

Looping Star fMRI in Cognitive Tasks and Resting State.

J Magn Reson Imaging. 2020 Feb 19;:

Authors: Dionisio-Parra B, Wiesinger F, Sämann PG, Czisch M, Solana AB

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Conventional T2 *-weighted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is performed with echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences that create substantial acoustic noise. The loud acoustic noise not only affects the activation of the auditory cortex, but may also interfere with resting state and task fMRI experiments.
PURPOSE: To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel, quiet, T2 *, whole-brain blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD)-fMRI method, termed Looping Star, compared to conventional multislice gradient-echo EPI.
STUDY TYPE: Prospective.
PHANTOM/SUBJECTS: Glover stability QA phantom; 10 healthy volunteers.
FIELD STRENGTH/SEQUENCE: 3.0T: gradient echo (GE)-EPI and T2 * Looping Star fMRI.
ASSESSMENT: Looping Star fMRI was presented and compared to GE-EPI with a working memory (WM) task and resting state (RS) experiments. Temporal stability and acoustic measurements were obtained for both methods. Functional maps and activation accuracy were compared to evaluate the performance of the novel sequence.
STATISTICAL TESTS: Mean and standard deviation values were analyzed for temporal stability and acoustic noise tests. Activation maps were assessed with one-sample t-tests and contrast estimates (CE). Paired t-tests and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) were used to compare fMRI sensitivity and performance.
RESULTS: Looping Star presented a 98% reduction in sound pressure compared with GE-EPI, with stable temporal stability (0.09% percent fluctuation), but reduced temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR) (mean difference = 15.9%). The novel method yielded consistent activations for RS and WM (83.4% and 69.5% relative BOLD sensitivity), which increased with task difficulty (mean CE 2-back = 0.56 vs. 0-back = 0.08, P < 0.05). A few differences in spatial activations were found between sequences, leading to a 4-8% lower activation accuracy with Looping Star.
DATA CONCLUSION: Looping Star provides a suitable approach for whole-brain coverage with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution and BOLD sensitivity, with only 0.5 dB above ambient noise. From the comparison with GE-EPI, further developments of Looping Star fMRI should target increased sensitivity and spatial specificity for both RS and task experiments.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2.
TECHNICAL EFFICACY STAGE: 1.

PMID: 32073206 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

The feasibility and acceptability of research magnetic resonance imaging in adolescents with moderate-severe neuropathic pain.

Thu, 02/20/2020 - 14:00
Related Articles

The feasibility and acceptability of research magnetic resonance imaging in adolescents with moderate-severe neuropathic pain.

Pain Rep. 2020 Jan-Feb;5(1):e807

Authors: Verriotis M, Moayedi M, Sorger C, Peters J, Seunarine K, Clark CA, Walker SM

Abstract
Introduction: Multimodal characterisation with questionnaires, Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST), and neuroimaging will improve understanding of neuropathic pain (NeuP) in adolescents. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in adolescents with NeuP are limited, and the perceived practical or ethical burden of scanning may represent a barrier to research.
Objective: To determine the feasibility of MRI scanning in adolescents with moderate-severe NeuP, with respect to consent rate, postscan acceptability, and data quality.
Methods: This prospective cohort study evaluating questionnaires and QST recruited adolescents aged 10 to 18 years with clinically diagnosed NeuP from a tertiary clinic. Eligible adolescents aged 11 years and older could additionally agree/decline an MRI scan. After the scan, families rated discomfort, perceived risk, and acceptability of current and future MRI scans (0-10 numerical rating scales). Head motion during scanning was compared with healthy controls to assess data quality.
Results: Thirty-four families agreed to MRI (72% recruitment), and 21 adolescents with moderate-severe pain (average last week 6.7 ± 1.7; mean ± SD) and with neuropathic QST profiles were scanned. Three adolescents reported positional or noise-related discomfort during scanning. Perceived risk was low, and acceptability of the current scan was high for parents (range [median]: 7 to 10/10 [10]) and adolescents (8-10/10 [10]). Willingness to undergo a future research scan was high for parents (7-10/10 [10]) and adolescents (5-10/10 [10]) and did not differ from future scans for clinical purposes. Mean head motion during resting state functional MRI did not differ from control adolescents.
Conclusion: Research MRI is feasible and acceptable for many adolescents with moderate-severe NeuP.

PMID: 32072101 [PubMed]

Calgary Preschool magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset.

Thu, 02/20/2020 - 14:00
Related Articles

Calgary Preschool magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset.

Data Brief. 2020 Apr;29:105224

Authors: Reynolds JE, Long X, Paniukov D, Bagshawe M, Lebel C

Abstract
The Calgary Preschool MRI Dataset in the Developmental Neuroimaging Lab at the University of Calgary uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to study brain structure and function in early childhood [1-3]. The dataset aims to characterise brain development in early childhood (2-8 years), and to understand links to cognitive and behavioral development, as well as provide a baseline from which to identify atypical development in children with diseases, disorders, or brain injuries. MRI data are provided for 126 children (61 males, 65 females). Children ranged from 1.95 to 6.22 years (mean = 3.98 ± 1.06 years) at the time of their first scan and were initially scanned at six month intervals, and now continue to be followed annually (1-20 scans per child, 431 total datasets; datasets do not always have all scan modalities available). All MRI scans were acquired on the same General Electric 3T MR750w system and 32-channel head coil (GE, Waukesha, WI) at the Alberta Children's Hospital in Calgary, Canada. The MRI protocols provided in this dataset include: T1-weighted images acquired using a FSPGR BRAVO sequence; arterial spin labeling (ASL) images acquired with the vendor supplied pseudo continuous 3D ASL sequence; diffusion tensor imaging data acquired using single shot spin echo echo-planar imaging; and passive viewing resting state functional MRI data acquired with a gradient-echo echo-planar imaging sequence.

PMID: 32071993 [PubMed]

Pages